QUILTS & FABRIC: PAST & PRESENT


Tuesday, August 11, 2020

Centennial Suffrage Fabric 2020 Give-Away


August 26, 2020 is the 100th Anniversary of the official certification of the ratification of the 19th amendment so I had a give-away this week.

Poster by Bertha Margaret Boye

A national celebration of the Centennial would be ideal but those in charge do not seem interested in celebrating women's right to vote. States and local organizations had many events scheduled before the pandemic but parades and other public events are on cautionary hold.


You might want to celebrate the anniversary yourself with a quilt or a scrap of fabric in a quilt you are working on this year.


Here's a celebratory grid that you could print out on pre-treated fabric cut 8-1/2 x 11 inches. 

One Way to Print:
Create a word file or a new empty JPG file that is 8-1/2" x 11".
Click on the image above.
Right click on it and save it to your file.
Print that file out 8-1/2" x 11" on pre-treated fabric.


The grid with dots is drawn from a shirting print done in 1876 for
the Centennial anniversary of the Declaration of Independence.


The document print



I also designed three other Suffrage Centennial Prints you can buy at Spoonflower. They'll print them to order.

Document print for the eagle fabric

 GIVE-AWAY WINNERS


I picked two winners based on their good ideas for an August 26th celebration.

Maxine said:
I will contact every eligible (of age) female member of my family to make sure they are registered to vote in the November election. I will make sure they vote either by mail or in person.

Michele has been writing about suffrage on her blog, Pennsylvania Piecemaker which celebrated the centennial for a full year of blog posts on a variety of suffrage topics. My partner Beth and I sponsored a Suffrage Centennial Quilt Challenge and the winners for that will be announced on August 18. 
She also made a suffrage garden in her front yards with "flowers in yellow, purple, and white. I put signs up and people have been coming by to see the garden, read the signs, and take photos."
http://pennsylvaniapiecemaker.blogspot.com/

See the links for all four fabrics on Spoonflower (I'm working on a fifth):

The shirting grid:
https://www.spoonflower.com/designs/9931436-centennial-women-s-vote-by-materialculture
I am still working on the scale on this---They'll probably print a larger grid.

A traditional eagle


https://www.spoonflower.com/designs/9931309-suffrage-centennial-by-materialculture


A more contemporary look --- or feedsack flashback




Here's a list of exhibits scheduled for this Centennial year.
https://www.2020centennial.org/exhibits-2

And some of my favorite comments:
Arlene
As part of my DAR Chapter, a few of us entered the fiber arts contest that was centered on the anniversary of women’s suffrage giving us the right to vote. Our quilt top wall hanging (3x4 12 inch blocks) won 3rd place in our district. For ongoing activities, I am sharing via facebook any information I find regarding the anniversary of women securing the right to vote. I am also advocating for all people to get out and vote when they have the opportunity. I’ve also sent my niece, who is now sewing on her own, information on quilting in general and fabric in the suffrage colors to make something to commemorate the 100th anniversary of our right to vote.

Bettina
August 26 would be the 80th birthday of my husband. There was no greater champion of women's rights. He taught for forty years at a women's college, one of the few strictly for women's education left in the US. He supported and nourished the growth of his students. Many of those students spoke or posted on Facebook of the contribution he made to their education. Celebrating the day would underwrite his commitment. If you're born on the 26th of August you are ordained to support women's rights.

Geri
I think I will get my granddaughters together and we will have a party and read your blog again and Mor information on this special day. I will take my sewing machine and we will make a simple quilt.

Nancy
I think I'll publish a blog post on my family history blog with the names and ages of the women in my family who were eligible to vote in 1920. A search of local newspapers of the time wouldn't go amiss, either. Too bad I can't find voting rosters for the places where they lived in 1920.

 Loretta
My mother-in-law, Carrie Frances, who was born in 1909 and who died when she was 105 years old, remembered and passed down, not just the family silver, but the 1920 election story she remembered from the year when her mother got the right to vote. We will be celebrating the day by setting the table with the good china and the family silver, the silver her mother won by betting against her husband on the outcome of the election in 1920, the very first year women could vote for President. Warren G. Harding won by a landslide, and Annie got her silver. We will also display a quilt Annie made. My mother-in-law went in person to vote every year for her entire life, right up until she was 105 years old.
  
Rebecca

That’s our first day of school so I guess I’m celebrating by teaching the next generation of women voters.

61 comments:

  1. 2020 Will be remembered (by me anyway) as the year of cancelled celebrations. We had such big plans for celebrating Maine's Bicentennial along with the "right to vote"! Instead, my niece and I are planning a Zoom (if I can figure it out) celebration on the 18th which is when her state (Tennessee) became the last state to ratify. I'm hopping over to Spoonflower now to order the fabulous eagle print. Thanks a million!

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  2. well august 26th is the day before my birthday so i'll be enjoying the last moments of being 70, but i will also be displaying my flag and a special post on my blog to honor the brave women who fought and obtained the vote, including my long-ago DAR sisters...fantastic giveaway....

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  3. I'm so glad you posted this Barbara! Like many other historians, this year was booked full of lectures on suffrage themed programs and all have been cancelled now. I'm still doing my blog, Pennsylvania Piecemaker which celebrated the centennial for a full year of blog posts on a variety of suffrage topics. My partner Beth and I sponsored a Suffrage Centennial Quilt Challenge and the winners for that will be announced on August 18. The one way I could reach locals was my Suffrage Garden. Yeh there was such a thing and I did a ton of research on the gardens. I adapted my front garden to a suffrage garden with flowers in yellow, purple, and white. I put signs up and people have been coming by to see the garden, read the signs, and take photos! I don't need the fabric by the way, I did buy a ton of your fabric at Spoonflower. It's just been such a bust of a year and even our local newscasters don't seem much interested in running stories on the centennial. Have a wonderful day and a sweet centennial! Thank you for reminding your readers of this important milestone in women's history!

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  4. I didn't plan it this way, but I finished my Grandmother's Choice BOW quilt (and a mini quilt of the scraps) and blogged about it on August 1st. In keeping with the state of Louisiana's disinterest in ratifying the 19th amendment, I didn't think there would be many observations around the state, but you prompted me to search. I don't know what has been/will be canceled due to the pandemic, but I'm going to keep an eye on the observances I did find. Thanks for all the G'mother's Choice blocks and history lessons!

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  5. I have planned to work on a GWV project (green/white/violet) project on August 26. I know that several color schemes were emblematic of the suffrage movement, but I'm partial to Give Women the Vote. Thanks for the giveaway opportunity! A few years ago I found out that Eliza Calvert Hall, who wrote about "Aunt Jane of Kentucky" including quilt stories, was also a suffrage activist. What I learned and now appreciate was that there was a big grass-roots suffrage movement with dozens/hundreds of local suffrage proponents. The big names -- Carrie Chapman Catt, Alice Paul, etc. -- couldn't have done it without the state-level network. [And now that correspondence is so easy -- email, social media -- it's wondrous to realize that their medium was mail with some telephoning (long distance was expensive back then).]

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  6. I don't have a blog but I will be posting on social media and reminding my women friends. I'll have to get some Spoonflower if I don't win. Thanks.

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  7. I will be at the New England Quilt Museum where the exhibit, "Deeds Not Words: Celebrating 100 Years of Women's Suffrage" is on display. I'll also be posting on Facebook about a woman from my city, Marlborough, Massachusetts, who is in the Seneca Falls Women's History Hall of Fame.

    collections@nequiltmuseum.org

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  8. I will raise a glass of wine to my friend, Janet, who passed in February. She was a History professor, specializing in Women’s History, and was so looking forward to celebrating this milestone. My Grandmother’s Choice is done so maybe another quilt is in the future.

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  9. Love these designs! I will be celebrating the upcoming birth of a coworker's child the morning of the 26th and in the evening I will raise a glass of wine to our foremothers who fought so hard for our right to vote. Recently, the 86-year-old aunt I care for stated that she would not vote this year. She is usually quite politically tuned in so I was shocked when she made this atypical statement. She was in strange mood (probably because her blood sugar was very high), but I told her that I would "disown" her if she did not vote. She signed the absentee ballot request that I put in front of her. ;-)

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    Replies
    1. OMG...this is elder abuse! Johanna...your aunt is a free woman to do as she wishes. By sharing her age in effort to diminish her is ageist...to imply she that is mentally deficient to justify your behavior is pathetic. Maybe she just didn’t want to sign because you are a bully and she was standing up to you by resisting. When your aunt‘s ballot comes in are you going to stand over her stomping your feet and and insisting that she vote for the candidate of your choice? As you admit she is dependent on you...what else can do but obey. Johanna...you should be reported...who knows what else you are doing to this poor woman. I applaud your aunt for attempting to remain an independent woman in a repressive environment!

      Delete
    2. Oops...excuse me...Joanna. My mother-in-law’s name was Johanna so it is easy to go there...she must be thinking of me...I certainly think of her.

      Delete
  10. I will be quilting as usual and be thinking of all quilters that came before us. Remembering all their struggles for rights as women.

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  11. Your designs are inspiring. I like to make medallion quilts and can imagine using a special fabric in the central block of a medallion.
    My small meditation group will be meeting, outside, distanced, under a shade tree at a small recreation area. I feel fortunate that we can get together in this way, and we can discuss the rights of women before our meditation. Thanks for sharing with us.

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  12. Arlene S.
    As part of my DAR Chapter, a few of us entered the fiber arts contest that was centered on the anniversary of women’s suffrage giving us the right to vote. Our quilt top wall hanging (3x4 12 inch blocks) won 3rd place in our district. For ongoing activities, I am sharing via facebook any information I find regarding the anniversary of women securing the right to vote. I am also advocating for all people to get out and vote when they have the opportunity. I’ve also sent my niece, who is now sewing on her own, information on quilting in general and fabric in the suffrage colors to make something to commemorate the 100th anniversary of our right to vote.

    Email: savethepieces@msn.com

    ReplyDelete
  13. On that auspicious day I'll be doing what all our quilting foremothers were doing at this season of the year, harvesting and processing the day's yield from our three gardens, and hand quilting the current quilt in the hoop during the evening hours. Wonderful shirting print!

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  14. Thank you for the reminder about the date and the wonderful fabrics you've designed. On the 26th I have a quilt show committee meeting (virtual) and we'll toast the brave, stubborn, feisty women who fought over generations for women's right to vote. Elizabeth Cady Stanton lived in Tenafly, NJ, (near me) when she and Susan B. Anthony wrote History of Woman Suffrage. In 1880, Stanton presented herself at the local polling station in 1880, but was refused the right to vote.

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  15. Wonderful commemoratives, I am always so thrilled to find one in a vintage quilt. The grid and the eagle are especially great. I will celebrate this important milestone by making sure I have requested my absentee ballot for the important election coming soon.

    lizzy

    lizzzz.d@gmail.com

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  16. I plan to visit the Women’s Suffrage exhibit at the NEQM.

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  17. In honor of the suffragettes, I have voted in every election and primary for 40 years.

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  18. My grandmother was a suffragette. I have her picture in a parade for the right to vote from the front page of the Roto Gravure. August 26 was also my mother’s birthday, so I’ll have to celebrate both that day! It’s an honor to be related to a suffragette. 💓
    macc(at)monmouth(dot)com

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  19. That’s our first day of school so I guess I’m celebrating by teaching the next generation of women voters.

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  20. I'll be working on my Sturbridge Village quilt, red chintz print alternating with nine-patches of navy and white half-square triangles, and daydreaming about Barbara's eagles and how to use them.

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  21. I'm not a historian but I am a woman! I always encourage people to vote - especially women! On August 26, 2020 i will be celebrating the ratification of the 19th amendment with my three daughters who we have raised to be involved, interested, and intolerant of anything anti-woman.

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    Replies
    1. Forgot to add my email address which is sevenmovingvans@yahoo.com

      Delete
  22. It’s my birthday so I’ll be celebrating that. I’ve always be proud that my birthday is Women’s Equality Day! I will probably be working on a block for my Grandmother’s Choice quilt. And hopefully eating a good dinner!

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  23. Thank you for posting this wonderful information. I think I will get my granddaughters together and we will have a party and read your blog again and Mor information on this special day. I will take my sewing machine and we will make a simple quilt

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  24. One hundred years to the day the other half of America won our voice in the democratic process
    As a teacher, we fail to mention this in elementary school. No longer!
    I am making a scrap square-in-a-square quilt at the moment. This would look amazing in it!

    Colleen G
    grrsnfmly@aol.com

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  25. I will begin to celebrate this day by posting on social media, asking each and every woman to vote in this year's election. We must take advantage of this long fought for right!

    I will be working on a quilt for my granddaughter, who I am happy to say always votes!

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  26. Thanks for the great shirting, Barbara! I’m recovering from wrist surgery, so it will be a while before I can celebrate anything. I’ll for sure be abstaining from cooking and cleaning in honor of the hard working and brave women who fought for our rights!

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  27. I will hopefully be designing a hanging to use on a hall door at the assisted living. It will be something that I can use the fabric I will win in some way. I have always liked patriotic things and since I married an Eagleton I have been gathering eagle pictures etc. to hang on the wall.

    Susan Eagleton susan.eagleton@gmail.com

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  28. Unlike other groups, where there have been efforts to disenfranchise voters, there has been (as far as I know), not effort to disenfranchise women.

    Patt Seitas
    San Diego, CA

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  29. I plan on contacting my female friends and family members; pausing for a moment to thank all those women who worked to give us the vote.

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  30. I will be honoring my paternal grandmother who was a Suffragette in Chicago, Illinois during that time, and the lady who taught me to sew and knit. She was also a minister's wife, which made it all the more risque. She also made only one quilt, a trip around the world, that I now have the honor or possessing.

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  31. Our wonderful quilting group Shady Ladies long ago decided that our quilt show challenge for 2020 would be art quilts celebrating the 100th Anniversary of the19th Amendment. Although we have been unable to meet for many months, we are coming together virtually by sharing photos of our work. We had planned a big party and a march in costume with our quilts as banners to honor the event. Alas! The party has been cancelled and many of us are among most vulnerable, but our local paper is doing a feature on us this weekend and is promoting an informal, socially distanced, masked, no-gathering, white-wearing, banner waving, community-based march around our local lake. We just couldn’t let it go by without a very proper salute!
    Wish I could share photos here. They are wonderful!
    Susan Skuda
    Waynesville, NC
    SusanSkuda@gmail.com

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  32. I’ve been celebrating for a year already, presenting my lecture and trunk show “Quilting for the Cause,” until the quarantine canceled my bookings. Also arranged several Special Exhibits focused on women’s accomplishments for the annual Minnesota Quilt Show. Many have been rescheduled for 2021. On August 26th I plan on rewatching the PBS documentary on Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony, and begin planI guess a commemorative quilt using some of the suffrage fabrics I have been collecting. Thank you for all the research you do to bring women’s history to the forefront.

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  33. August 26th is my youngest daughter's birthday. As she's over 21 we will be celebrating with a toast to honor both her day and our right to VOTE!

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  34. Foxy Martha said:
    I will celebrate the centennial of suffrage by committing to VOTE in 2020 and in every upcoming election for the REST of my life. mliska@comcast.net

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  35. Great reasons to celebrate August 26, 2020. I will contact every eligible (of age) female member of my family to make sure they are registered to vote in the November election. I will make sure they vote either by mail or in person.
    Bertha Maxine Henderson Mallard

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  36. Sadly, my name is not Barbara, but I had an Aunt Barb does that count? No quilt is being worked on at the moment, as I'm still re-assembling my sewing room after tearing up the carpet and painting everything including the floor. Sewing will commence once I move the newly cleaned rug back upstairs. Dolly crossed over the rainbow bridge on June 4th, so the rug should stay clean for awhile. To celebrate my right to vote, well unfortunately, I'll be working at the big box store that makes us wear masks and yet refuses to cool down their buildings with decent air conditioning. Since I cannot think of any other magic words, I'll simply say thank you for this generous offer.

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  37. I would like to spend the day campaigning for candidates I believe have women's interest in mind. That may not be possible in this climate. I am so grateful to the women who risk everything to get women the vote. I WILL get out Tracy Chevalier's book Falling Angels and re-read it. It is about the movement. Maybe I will watch some Murdoch Mysteries. I think it is in season 11 or 12 where one of the subplots is about the suffragette movement in Canada.

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  38. I will be quilting, thankful to all the women that made the women's vote possible, and to give the women a voice

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  39. My mother-in-law, Carrie Frances, who was born in 1909 and who died when she was 105 years old, remembered and passed down, not just the family silver, but the 1920 election story she remembered from the year when her mother got the right to vote. We will be celebrating the day by setting the table with the good china and the family silver, the silver her mother won by betting against her husband on the outcome of the election in 2020, the very first year women could vote for President. Warren G. Harding won by a landslide, and Annie got her silver. We will also display a quilt Annie made. My mother-in-law went in person to vote every year for her entire life, right up until she was 105 years old.

    By the way, my mother’s name was Barbara, but she wasn’t born until 1929, nine years after women like my Grandmother attained full citizenship through their right to cast a vote. When we think about our grandmothers, that’s when we understand how close we are to our own right to vote.

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  40. What great timing to have this article on the day we have a female vice presitential candidate announced!

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  41. While I will be working that day, I will celebrate every way I can during non-work hours and remind people of the commemoration. More importantly, I intend to celebrate again on 3 November when I will exercise my right to vote! stwaddell2010@gmail.com

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  42. I'll be making facetime contacts with each of my 3 granddaughters (ages 7, 12, 14 ) to talk about how lucky they are to be able to vote. I live near Rochester, NY so will make a visit to Mt Hope Cemetery ith my daughter to say Thank You to Susan B for her part in getting us this privilege. kjschaffer49@hotmail.com

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  43. I so rarely win random draws but I did want to thank you for the reminder of this centennial and for the fabric images. You're amazing!
    Since you've asked and reminded me, I think I'll publish a blog post on my family history blog with the names and ages of the women in my family who were eligible to vote in 1920. A search of local newspapers of the time wouldn't go amiss, either. Too bad I can't find voting rosters for the places where they lived in 1920.
    Thanks again for the reminder, the fabric, and the giveaway.

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  44. I will celebrate by making a "Votes for Women" small quilt using your wonderful gift. I love that shifting and will be printing several sheets. Thank you. Quilt will also be using green and purple and will honor the women who made his possible. I'll also be applying for an absentee ballot if it's not too early.
    100 anniversay, a much better memory than our current situation.

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  45. I'll be quilting and remembering the women who never gave up.

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  46. I'll be working, so as always I'll be including as many voices of women that I can (I work in TV news... my target audience is women!) I watched the recent documentary on Women *earning the vote on PBS (It was NOT given to women), it's very inspiring -- I'm not sure if it's still available to view on PBS, but everyone should try to watch it.

    (Also I'll be trying to catch up on your block of the month, Barbara.. With work stress etc, I'm terribly behind!)

    kdianehodges at gmail dot com

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  47. I plan on working on my quilting and hope to be completing my quarantine quilt made of blue scraps to celebrate that I have choices and a voice in my future as a voter. malaysiakelley at yahoo dot com

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  48. August 26 would be the 80th birthday of my husband. There was no greater champion of women's rights. He taught for forty years at a women's college, one fo the few strictly for women's education left in the US. He supported and nourished the growth of his students. Many of those students spoke or posted on Facebook of the contribution he made to their education.
    Celebrating the day would underwrite his commitment. If you're born on the 26th of August you are ordained to support women's rights.

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  49. Awesome! Maybe celebrate with a chocolate cake???

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  50. August 26th - a celebration of the my right to vote and a wedding anniversary, mine! - I remember well, too the first year I was able to vote and indeed what an auspicious year to vote - Richard Nixon won the election of 1972 irregardless of my vote for the Democratic nominee... the days to follow where full of hearings, tapes, disgrace, and resignation...indeed, a glorious time to celebrate women's right to vote and! the nomination of Kamala Harris as vice-president to Joe Biden, president-elect of the USA.
    Cake - time for cake!

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  51. What a wonderful gift it would be for me to win the eagle as medallion for a small quilt to celebrate the 100th anniversary of our right to vote. Perhaps surrounded by Sister's Choice blocks in purple and gold and white.

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  52. 2 minutes to midnight and I just found your page! Yay

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  53. Thank you so much for the beautiful Suffrage 2020 fabrics. I will treasure them and use them in a quilt as soon as possible.

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