QUILTS & FABRIC: PAST & PRESENT

QUILTS & FABRIC: PAST & PRESENT By Quilt Historian Barbara Brackman Above: Moda's Morris Earthly Paradise

Tuesday, June 14, 2016

Adjusting Quilt Pattern and Printing Size


Readers write that they are having a hard time printing the pattern for the weekly Morris Hexathon because their printers are not giving them a hexagon with 4" sides---or 7" across.


Becky says this is a problem with her printer too. Instead of  measuring 7" across the patterns come out 6-7/8".

Evil printer

Here are some solutions.

1---Get someone to advise you on coordinating your printer with your computer. This will make your life easier in the long run. You know----long term gain versus short term pain.
Here's a tutorial on one common problem:
https://askleo.com/why_dont_pdfs_print_at_the_same_size_as_the_original/

2. Naah! You are looking for a short term fix.


2A. Use a proportion wheel or a proportional scale.

Self Portrait with Proportional Scale by
 Sofonisba Anguissola (1532-1635)

I'm not saying a thing about Becky but I am old enough to recall when every artist had one of these simple cardboard wheels on her drafting table.

Print the block out. Measure the width. In Becky's case 6-7/8" or 6.875. Using the wheel (there are YouTube videos that tell you how to do this) figure out how much bigger or smaller the printer has to print the image. In Becky's case it is 102%. Tell your printer to print it at 102%.
Another option is to reprint it on a copy machine at 102%.


2B. Figure it out mathematically.
Becky sez: "If you don't have a "wheel" you can do the math:
Desired size divided by present size = percentage of change.
Example: 7" divided by 6.875 = 1.018 - Round up to 102% (move the decimal point over 2 digits)."


2C. Use a digital proportion wheel.
This is an online tool that will do the math for you. The site that comes up first is Knight Printing's calculator from Fargo. 
Adjust your printer to print at the correct percentage.

Mary's blocks


3. Use 60 degree angle rulers and just use my pattern as a design guide. Mary Huey shows how she's using her rulers here:

http://maryhueyquilts.blogspot.com/2016/05/y-seam-warrior-link-up-3-indulging-in.html

This 60 degree diamond could be very useful.


Look at this whole thing as an opportunity for personal growth.

15 comments:

Gypsy Quilter said...

Personal growth can be a good thing, but would I have to wear a gold crown and carry flowers if I participate?

Suzanne A said...

It's easy to draft hexagons with a ruler and a compass. I'M going to bypass the printer.

1. Set compass to radius of 4". Marking the center point in which you stick the compass, make the 8" diameter circle.

2. Leaving exact same compass setting as Step one, mark a point on the circle, stick the compass point in it and draw an arc that intersects the circle.

3. Place point of compass where the arc of step 2 intersects the circle and praw another arc that intersects the circle. Repeat until you have marked 6 point on your circle which if carefully done will be evenly spaced.

4. Use ruler and draw lines across the circle (but NOT thru the middle) to connect alternate points -- three lines makes a big triangle connecting three point on the circle. Repeat by connecting the remaining three dots on the circle, you have two interlocking triangles.

5 To complete the "star" use the ruler to draw a line from the center of the circle to each point where the triangles intersect. You should have the six 60 degree diamond star points.

6. To complete the large hexagon, connect each outer point of the stars.

7. Erase guide lines and arcs.

Suzanne A said...

It's easy to draft hexagons with a ruler and a compass. I'M going to bypass the printer.

1. Set compass to radius of 4". Marking the center point in which you stick the compass, make the 8" diameter circle.

2. Leaving exact same compass setting as Step one, mark a point on the circle, stick the compass point in it and draw an arc that intersects the circle.

3. Place point of compass where the arc of step 2 intersects the circle and praw another arc that intersects the circle. Repeat until you have marked 6 point on your circle which if carefully done will be evenly spaced.

4. Use ruler and draw lines across the circle (but NOT thru the middle) to connect alternate points -- three lines makes a big triangle connecting three point on the circle. Repeat by connecting the remaining three dots on the circle, you have two interlocking triangles.

5 To complete the "star" use the ruler to draw a line from the center of the circle to each point where the triangles intersect. You should have the six 60 degree diamond star points.

6. To complete the large hexagon, connect each outer point of the stars.

7. Erase guide lines and arcs.

Lin said...

I printed out a sheet of 1/4" square paper. I used a 60 degree ruler to draw up a hexagon then printed off lots of copies so that I know have my hexagon drawn to the right size each week and just have to draw in the latest pattern.

desertskyquilts said...

Barbara, I enjoyed this post so much! You did a great job on it. I laughed several times. Your instructions are excellent. However, after printing out my own on cardstock, I chose a different path. It wasn't the size that caused the problem. I didn't like the material I had to print on. I called Paper Pieces. In the last year they did a wonderful Millefiore type of paper piecing project, and it needed a lot of the size and shapes we are using. So far, I've been able to buy all the paper pieces from them (I don't know about Westminster, because I used the ones I printed, but they have all those, since some of them are the ones I've bought for other blocks..) I bought small packages, not all at one time, so it wasn't very expensive in any one purchase and I can reuse them.

Brigitte Giblin said...

I just love the math on this post Barbara! It's hilarious!

Rachel said...

Loved this post, Barbara! Brought back many scary memories of the old days. We're so used now to everything done for us. -- Rachel

Jeanne said...

I'm feeling grateful that my printer is cooperating with me :)

Anonymous said...

Best tutorial I've seen on size adjustment. One to bookmark or file away for future reference.
Thanks!

Chris said...

At the suggestion of someone earlier, I print mine off on A4 paper setting and they come out perfectly. I started printing them onto card stock then found the CutRite heavy-duty freezer paper that I can run through my printer.

Mary in Maryland said...

Or she could just make 6.875 inch blocks.

Susan said...

LOL, thanks for the laugh. I hate my printer anyway. Always wanting more expensive ink cartridges.

Churn Dash said...

I worked out that I had to print mine at 200%

My question is, does it matter that they are not 7" across if they are all the same size they will work together.

I've made three blocks, I've three more prepared. Hopefully I'll catch up. Thanks so much for doing this for us.

Helen

Mary Huey said...

Thanks, Barbara!! I'm forging ahead with my templates and getting blocks that are 3" on a side -- smaller but just as nice and NO MATH.

Barbara Brackman said...

Helen
It really doesn't matter what size they finish to as long as they all finish to the same size---within an 1/8" or so.