QUILTS & FABRIC: PAST & PRESENT


Saturday, July 31, 2021

Paper Needlebooks


 I used to collect these post-World-War-II needlebooks when I spent my spare time in thrift stores, paying a quarter or even more. The graphics were weird and entertaining.

Often depicting sewing as a social event:
A mid-20-century Japanese view of the American customer.


They are a lot more expensive now but I still collect the pictures from online auctions.

And still weird.


There are also German versions

Sewing as Fun, fun, fun!


The strangest graphics connect sewing with the atomic age.

Space travel



And supersonic aircraft


Hah! If technology is so great how come needles don't have eyes
big enough that I can thread them?

12 comments:

  1. I have never seen some of these! Thanks for sharing!

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  2. I used to collect needlebooks, too, and had that one with the rocket ship. Thought my collecting days were over but recently bought one for 50-cents at a garage sale "Compliments of A&P Food Stores." What fun!

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  3. I have 3, including the blue one with cat and dog, and another cat one. Only one with people - for some reason those never appealed to me. I've never seen the space ship ones, my collection would definitely be larger if I did.

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  4. These are amazing and silly! I know my mom had some but who knows where they ended up.

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  5. Asian (prob. Japanese?) interpretation of what Caucasians look like. Most likely western depictions of Asians look somewhat-off-base to them. Interesting how the Space Age theme was used on so many things!

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  6. I've never seen these either. So fun. I agree on the needle threading. There's got to be a way so I don't lick the thread to death. :)

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  7. My Zoom program on paper needle books has been well received. I cover 180 years of examples!

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  8. These made me laugh. I love it.

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  9. Strangely I read about these needle books this morning and a friend gave me a sewing basket that was her mother-in-laws this afternoon. Inside was a needle book. An exact copy of the second book featured in the article.

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  10. I collect these too. They are getting harder to find. Because the needlebOoks usually lived in a sewing basket or box, they got beat up pretty bad.

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  11. I have my grandmother's from the World's Fair ... A Century of Progress

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