QUILTS & FABRIC: PAST & PRESENT

QUILTS & FABRIC: PAST & PRESENT By Quilt Historian Barbara Brackman Above: Moda's Baltimore Blues. It's not all blue.

Saturday, September 3, 2016

Morris Hexathon 18: Parquetry


Morris Hexathon 18: Parquetry by Bettina Havig
Parquetry by Becky Brown

I named this week's hexie Parquetry, 
a word for wood mosaics used in floors and furniture.

Chest with parquet decoration


Parquet floor (pronounced Par'-kay in the U.S.)

A parquet floor would be one more pattern in a thoroughly designed Morris room. An early model for that fashionable room is now called the Green Dining Room at the Victoria and Albert Museum.

The restored Green Dining Room

About 1865 Morris, Marshall, Faulkner & Company was commissioned to design a refreshment room at the new South Kensington Museum, an important job for the new firm. (In 1899 the museum was renamed the Victoria and Albert Museum to please the Queen.)


This room established several standards for decoration, among them the idea of dividing a wall into separate decorative areas. 
Morris biographer Fiona McCarthy has noted: "This division of the wall surface into three areas -dado, filling and then frieze---would be adopted as the norm for middle class 'artistic' houses of the 1870s and 1880s."

The Green Dining Room is a must-stop for any Morris fan in London.

The work was collaborative. The windows depicts the seasons in glass designed by Edward Burne-Jones.

A ceiling sunburst

Wall and ceiling decoration was by Philip Webb.

Webb's green wall panels have a surface relief. At the top here is the
freize, the strip below the ceiling. 

The V and A Cafe once again serves meals in the Green Dining Room.

The floor is patterned.


Visitors to the Victoria and Albert Museum
need to keep their eyes downcast to appreciate the
marvelous floors of tiles and parquetry all over the building.

The one-patch pattern has no BlockBase number as a Hexagon. It's
often thought of as a triangle, pieced of three tumblers.
Like this detail of Bettina's block

As a triangle it's BlockBase #152a
Names include:
  • Right Angle Patchwork from an English needlework book in 1882  (There are no right angles.)
  • Ecclesiastical from the Ladies' Art Company catalog about 1898
  • Crazy Tile from the Kansas City Star in 1939.


When I made the BlockBase name list years ago I didn't see Nancy Cabot's
 Monk's Puzzle from the Chicago Tribune

Morris Hexathon 18: Parquetry by Ilyse Moore

Pattern for an 8" Hexagon
(4" sides)

To Print:
  • Create a word file or a new empty JPG file that is 8-1/2" x 11". 
  • Click on the image above. 
  • Right click on it and save it to your file. 
  • Print that file out 8-1/2" x 11". The hexagon side should measure 4" across.
  • Adjust the printed page size if necessary.
  • Add seams when you cut the fabric.

One More Inspiration

Parquetry teaboxes


Floor in the Catherine Palace in Russia

Mosaic tile floor at the Victoria & Albert

4 comments:

Nann said...

There are beautiful parquet floors at the Driehaus Museum in Chicago. (That's the current name. The mansion was built by Samuel Nickerson in 1883, one of those spare-no-expense exercises in oneupmanship.

Mary Huey said...


Enjoying all these historic tidbits of information so much!! Though I do think the V&A needs to rethink the tables and chairs in the green room -- really makes the space look blah!!

JustGail said...

The museum is gorgeous! I wonder if Right Angle pattern might really mean Correct Angle instead of the geometry right angle? Because I can see that if you don't have them correct, this pattern will go wrong fast.

Charlers John said...

Thanx, this is very Informational Post to Read now I am Waiting for your next post
Parquetry