QUILTS & FABRIC: PAST & PRESENT

QUILTS & FABRIC: PAST & PRESENT By Quilt Historian Barbara Brackman Above: Moda's Morris Earthly Paradise

Tuesday, March 29, 2016

Wild Oats, Fruitlands, Walden and Wayside: Document Prints.

Vintage silhouette of a woman and her work.

The Sew Simple Quilt Shoppe in Ozark, Missouri, is offering a class in this kaleidoscope design
made with my Old Cambridge Pike fabrics.
http://www.sewsimplequilts.com/

The Old Cambridge Pike
Here are a few more of the document prints we interpreted for that Moda reproduction collection.
The print names are reminders of the New England intellectuals who lived along the road from Concord to Cambridge and Boston.

Someone lost her silver set along the Old Cambridge Pike
a long time ago.


I named the leaf print Wild Oats from one of Louisa May Alcott's
memoirs.




The document print (the original antique) is the dark brown triangle.


Another post with a little more about Wild Oats

#8322 Fruitlands

Fruitlands, another leafy calico, is named for the ill-fated commune
Louisa's father Bronson founded.

It's printed in six different madder colorways from pink to chocolate brown.

The document print is the larger scrap, a scattered leaflet
in madder shades.

A detail from the Antler Patterns kit Jubilee for
Old Cambridge Pike from Moda.

Wayside is the house that Sophia and Nathaniel Hawthorne occupied 
after the Alcotts moved down the road.


Document Print for this mid-century stripe is the light gray/blue.


You can't remember the generation who called themselves Young America without Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) who went to live in simple fashion in the woods by Walden Pond.

The hut at Walden Pond


Walden is the small paisley that's printed in three colorways, tan, green and brown.

I found the original print in this circa 1840 nine patch. It's the 
stained light paisley along the outer border.

Walden paisley is the olive green border here on Jubilee.
See more about the kit here:

Over the years I've read so much about the New England literary group. It is great fun for me to have fabrics named after them and their lives.

4 comments:

Ginny said...

Hi Barbara: Your post prompts me to let you know I just finished "The Peabody Sisters", which you recommended on your blog a few months ago. I wanted to thank you for the recommendation; what a wonderful book and a great learning experience for me. We studied the Transcendentalists in college, but this was so much more detailed and, of course, from the WOMEN's point of view. Awesome reading; anytime you feel like recommending more books, in additional to all the other great info you pass along . . . please do! Thanks again! Ginny from Harrisburg, PA

Erica in Alaska said...

Love to see the side-by-side images of the vintage fabric and the reproduction. You've mentioned "document prints" in several posts, but I still can't quite figure out what that is. Could you define? Thanks always for the great posts!

Barbara Brackman said...

The document print is the original antique fabric that we copied. It's a traditional name in the fabric business for the source fabric.

lynn jarzombeck said...

I too just finished "The Peabody Sisters". The book is terribly interesting and I have to admit I learned a great deal about a period of time in our nation's history that I had little knowledge of. Thank you Barbara for this great recommendation.