QUILTS & FABRIC: PAST & PRESENT

QUILTS & FABRIC: PAST & PRESENT By Quilt Historian Barbara Brackman Above: Moda's Morris Earthly Paradise

Thursday, November 14, 2013

Morris Modernized: Hope of Hertfordshire Quilt Pattern

 
Hope of Hertfordshire
90" x 90"
12" Finished Block
9" Finished Border

See the free quilt pattern below.


Here's a star block with many possibilities published as "Hope of Hartford" by the Farm Journal in 1945. I assume the name recalls the Huys de Hoop (House of Hope), the first settlement that Dutch colonists built in what the English later named Hartford, Connecticut.

Charles Voysey designed his own house 
The Orchard in Chorley Wood, Hertsfordshire
in 1899

Because I have planned the block in my very British Morris Modernized fabrics, originally designed by Charles Voysey, I changed the pattern name to Hope of Hertfordshire, the English county with the original spelling.

I Photoshopped it onto a bed at The Orchard.
Voysey designed everything, the door latches, the fireplace,
the rug, the furniture.

Like many of the Arts & Crafts designer he thought the best bedspread was plain white.
But What Fun is That???

So I've added a quilt.

And here is a vintage quilt made in the pattern from about 1950, made from that Farm Journal pattern, I bet.

The block is constructed sort of like a log cabin with pieced rectangles rotating around a center square.
I shaded it differently from the original, making the background triangles a little darker so some secondary patterning appears.

The lighter rectangles
create another pinwheel between the blocks.

You could do it scrappy as long as you had mediums and darks to shade the center, and lights and mediums for the backgrounds.Here's the yardage for a controlled color scheme with five fabrics.

I drew the quilt up in EQ and under the Print Menu hit Fabric Yardage, which told me the yardage for the whole quilt.

The darkest print - 1 3/8 yards. I used the darkest print in the line: #8260-14, Oleander in the red.


The medium print - 2-3/4 yards. I used the largest print 8266-15 in the lighter green and tan, Oswin
or 
or #8265-16,
Saladin in tan

The light background - 1-3/4 yards. I was thinking a Moda Bella Solid (#9900-67) Fig Tree Cream
The medium background - 1-1/8 yards of Bella Solid (#9900-179) Together Tan

The Border
EQ's calculations on the border assumes the strips are pieced but I am not going to piece mine, rather cut them as one strip parallel to the selvage but I come up with the same yardage, which is 2-3/4 yards. You can get four 9-1/2" strips out of a width of fabric. I plan to use the #8264.13, the lighter colorway of the Bird & Tulip print.


The print is not to scale in my mock-up at the top. 
A 9-1/2" strip would give you four repeats of the tulip.
So cut 2 strips 9-1/2" x 72-1/2" for the sides and 
2 strips 9-1/2" x 90-1/2" for the top and bottom borders.
If you want to miter it, cut 4 strips 9-1/2" x 90-1/2" 


Cutting a 12" Block

You need 49 blocks for a 7x7 grid.

A - Cut 4 light rectangles of background fabric 5-1/4" x 2-7/8"
B - Cut 1 square of medium background fabric and 1 square of dark print 6". Cut each into 4 triangles with 2 diagonal cuts. 

You need 4 dark print triangles and 4 medium background triangles.
C - Cut 1 dark print square 2-7/8"
D - Cut 2 squares 5-5/8" of medium print. Cut each into 2 triangles with 1 diagonal cut.

Piecing the Block




UPDATE
Zipjezopje says in the Comments:
Hi Barbara, you don't need to pivot to add the last part. When you add the centre square to unit one, you start sewing halfway of the square seen from the middle and sew to the end. Now you add rectangle two and three the way you show. Part four is added to the side of part three and to the centre square, because of the loose end you can sew till the end. Part four is now easily sewn to part one, and by doing so you also sew the part of the centre square.
Thanks Z



Here's the Farm Journal version from BlockBase--- #2586
but the old quilt I am copying had the triangles arranged in a different way---flipped---
which made more of a pinwheel, I thought. They are both cut to the same measurements, so you can see which one you like best on your design wall.

6 comments:

Karen in Breezy Point said...

You're right--that white bed cover is just no fun! Thanks for the fun block instructions.

Judith Blinkenberg said...

I bought off white linens and drapes for my bed but painted the walls yellow. It was still too bland so make a small foot quilt of your Morris Apprentice and a faux fur pillow. It does help. I can hardly wait for your new lines. I love your designs.

Barbara Brackman said...

Judith You should send a picture.

materialcult@gmail.com

zipjezopje said...

Hi Barbara, you don't need to pivot to add the last part. When you add the centre square to unit one, you start sewing halfway of the square seen from the middle and sew to the end. Now you add rectangle two and three the way you show. Part four is added to the side of part three and to the centre square, because of the loose end you can sew till the end. Part four is now easily sewn to part one, and by doing so you also sew the part of the centre square.

Diane said...

I have fallen in love with the Hope of Hertfordshire / Hope of Hartford pattern. A lot of that is because my maiden name is Hartford and I grew up on the farm with the Farm Journal - and Farmers Almanac - as the magazines of choice in the house! You mentioned you found the pattern in a 1945 edition of the Farm Journal. What month? I'd love to acquire a copy to go with the quilt I'm in the process of sewing!

Susie Robbins said...

I love this block and it makes a beautiful quilt. Thank you for sharing this.
Susan from Iowa