QUILTS & FABRIC: PAST & PRESENT


Saturday, July 20, 2019

Annie Garner's Quilts

Quilt by Annie Caroline Teagarden Garner
(1869-1950)
The West Virginia project saw the best quilts. See Annie Garner at Quilt Index.
Her diagonal pieced design above has been puzzling me for years.

At a quilt day in Wheeling in 1992 they saw three of Annie's
quilts, all made with the same late-19th century solid cottons.
But quite different styles.

Annie probably made these about 1890 when she was about 20.
She married John Garner (1863-1941) in 1888 and had four children. They
farmed in Wetzel County.

I color corrected the Quilt Index photos and squared them up a little.


Classic Southern quilts at the turn of the 20th century---solid fabrics, not very colorfast. 
It's nice to see one woman's work as a group.

This quilt seems to be a one-of-a-kind design.

It took me a ridiculously long time to figure out the repeat.

But here is the block. Annie set the blocks in a strip and then put the strip on the diagonal.
And she staggered the repeat in a half-drop design.




Which makes it hard to figure out.
But now that I have I feel quite smart.
Not quite as smart as Annie, however.

Some family information from Find-a-Grave

Wetzel County is on the Ohio River just east of Ohio

New Martinsville is the county seat, where Annie is buried.

7 comments:

Jacqueline said...

You should pat yourself on the back for figuring out her pattern. I sew enjoy your posts and the history you provide. Thanks

Susan said...

These are a wonderful addition to quilt enjoyment and inspiration. Thank you so much for sharing them!

Marianne Fons said...

Annie's one-of-a-kind looks like a tulip that though it was a tree or a tree that thought it was a tulip.

Marianne Fons said...

I meant to say "thought" it was a tree, not "though"!

Barbara Brackman said...

Tulip tree would be a good name.

Pieceful Lady said...

You never fail to amaze me and I thank you for your blog and insight into yesterday's quilts and the women who made them. Ordinary stitches but extraordinary Quilts.

Nann said...

That is an optical illusion, for sure. Thanks for sussing it out.